Symptoms of Bleeding Brain

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Thursday, 29 September 2011

Can a Brain Hemorrhages Be Prevented?

Can a Brain Hemorrhages Be Prevented?
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain
Because the majority of brain hemorrhages are associated with specific risk factors, you can minimize your risk in the following ways:

* Treat high blood pressure. Studies show that 80% of cerebral hemorrhage patients have a history of high blood pressure. The single most important thing you can do is control yours through diet, exercise, and medication.
* Don’t smoke.
* Don’t use drugs. Cocaine, for example, can increase the risk of bleeding in the brain.
* Drive carefully, and wear your seat belt.
* If you ride a motorcycle, always wear a helmet.
* Investigate corrective surgery. If you suffer from abnormalities, such as aneurysms, surgery may help to prevent future bleeding.
* Be careful with Coumadin. If you take this drug, also called warfarin, follow up regularly with your doctor to make sure your blood levels are in the correct range.
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain

Monday, 19 September 2011

Can People Recover From Brain Hemorrhages and Are There Possible Complications?

Can People Recover From Brain Hemorrhages and Are There Possible Complications?
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain
How well a patient responds to a brain hemorrhage depends on the size of the hemorrhage and the amount of swelling.

Some patients recover completely. Possible complications include stroke, loss of brain function, or side effects from medications or treatments. Death is possible, and may quickly occur despite prompt medical treatment.
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain

Monday, 29 August 2011

What Are the Symptoms of Brain Bleeding?

What Are the Symptoms of Brain Bleeding?
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain
The symptoms of a brain hemorrhage can vary. They depend on the location of the bleeding, the severity of the bleeding, and the amount of tissue affected. Symptoms may develop suddenly or over time. They may progressively worsen or suddenly appear.

If you exhibit any of the following symptoms, you may have a brain hemorrhage. This is a life-threatening condition, and you should call 911 or go to an emergency room immediately. The symptoms of bleeding brain include:

* a sudden severe headache
* seizures with no previous history of seizures
* weakness in an arm or leg
* nausea or vomiting
* decreased alertness; lethargy
* changes in vision
* tingling or numbness
* difficulty speaking or understanding speech
* difficulty swallowing
* difficulty writing or reading
* loss of fine motor skills, such as hand tremors
* loss of coordination
* loss of balance
* an abnormal sense of taste
* loss of consciousness

Keep in mind that many of these symptoms of bleeding brain are often caused by conditions other than brain hemorrhages.

Friday, 19 August 2011

What Causes Bleeding in the Brain?

What Causes Bleeding in the Brain?
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain
There are several risk factors and causes of brain hemorrhages. The most common include:

* Head trauma. Injury is the most common cause of bleeding in the brain for those under 50.
* High blood pressure. This chronic condition can, over a long period of time, weaken blood vessel walls. Untreated high blood pressure is a major preventable cause of brain hemorrhages.
* Aneurysm. This is a weakening in a blood vessel wall that swells. It can burst and bleed into the brain, leading to a stroke.
* Blood vessel abnormalities. Weaknesses in the blood vessels in and around the brain may be present at birth and diagnosed only if symptoms develop.
* Amyloid angiopathy. This is an abnormality of the blood vessel walls that sometimes occurs with aging. It may cause many small, unnoticed bleeds before causing a large one.
* Blood or bleeding disorders. Hemophilia and sickle cell anemia can both contribute to decreased levels of blood platelets.
* Liver disease. This condition is associated with increased bleeding in general.
* Brain tumors.
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain
symptoms-of-bleeding-brain-2

Friday, 5 August 2011

Symptoms of Bleeding Brain

Symptoms of Bleeding Brain

As a diabetic one of the things I must watch out for is strokes or aneurysms, etc. When diabetes is not controlled it can wreak havoc on the small blood vessels in our organs. This can over time cause those blood vessels to hemorrhage and this can manifest itself in a variety of ways. It can cause a stroke which is in when the blood stops flowing through a blood vessel and ceases to provide blood to a part of the brain, thus causing that part of the brain to die, subsequently we loose the functionality that part of the brain controlled. The opposite end of the spectrum is what is called an aneurysm, which is the rupture of a blood vessel. This causes bleeding of the sand if not addressed quickly can lead to death. So it is important that we know the symptoms of bleeding brain. They are:

If the blood vessel has ruptured:

* Nausea and vomiting
* Stiff neck or neck pain
* Blurred vision or double vision
* Pain above and behind the eye
* Dilated pupils
* Sensitivity to light
* Loss of sensation

If the blood vessel has not ruptured:

* Peripheral vision deficits
* Thinking or processing problems
* Speech complications
* Perceptual problems
* Sudden changes in behavior
* Loss of balance and coordination
* Decreased concentration
* Short-term memory difficulty
* Fatigue

Noticing these symptoms of bleeding brain for anyone would be wise, but especially so for diabetics. Early, proactive action will save your life.

Friday, 10 July 2009

Why Herrmohage Damage The Brain

Symptoms of Bleeding Brain
Why Herrmohage Damage The Brain


Subarachnoid bleeding brain or hemorrhage, or bleeding between the first two layers of tissue that protect the brain, is the subject of two papers published in January by Columbia Health Sciences researchers. One study examined predictors of cognitive dysfunction after such a bleeding brain and the other looked at whether an inflammatory marker can predict quality of life after the initial injury. By understanding what leads to impairment, doctors hope to develop interventions to prevent damage.

The publications employ data from a study on subarachnoid bleeding brain patients that Dr. Stephan Mayer, associate professor of clinical neurology (in neurological surgery) at P&S, and Kurt Kreiter, a doctoral student in neurology at P&S, began approximately five years ago. Dr. E. Sander Connolly, associate professor of neurological surgery, and his group later joined the study, which has about 500 patients enrolled.

A subarachnoid bleeding brain usually is caused by a ruptured aneurysm. Aneurysmal subarachnoid bleeding brain affects nearly 30,000 people in North America each year. The mortality rate in the first 30 days after the hemorrhage is about 50 percent, which is the highest for any type of stroke. Approximately half the survivors end up permanently disabled because of cognitive problems. While aneurysms can happen in any place in the circulatory system, these blood vessel dilations or balloonings typically occur in brain and heart arteries. In a subarachnoid bleeding brain, the aneurysm bursts and blood spills into the subarachnoid space around the brain, where the blood mixes with cerebrospinal fluid.

Spasm of the blood vessels—where the muscles that line the blood vessel wall contract and clamp down on the artery—and more bleeding from the original aneurysm can lead to death and stroke for a cerebral bleeding brain patient. If the bleeding vessel is surgically accessible, a clip can be put around the aneurysm or coils can be placed inside the aneurysm to speed clotting and close off the cavity. New York-Presbyterian Hospital has a neuro-intensive care unit that treats bleeding brain patients with surgery and other methods. But not much can be done to treat vasospasm.

The cognitive dysfunction study, led by Dr. Mayer, evaluated 113 patients three months after their bleeding brain and quantified the problems associated with subarachnoid bleeding brain, including location of the blood, hydrocephalus, edema (swelling), strokes, and infarction, or neural tissue death due to lack of blood. The research team found swelling and small strokes were the most important factors related to how badly the brain is affected. These findings were surprising to Dr. Mayer and his team because other published research had not investigated the effect of swelling on cognitive outcomes.

While it may be too soon to employ specific treatments from the findings, reducing swelling and removing leaked blood could limit harm. Strategies to reduce infarction, particularly on the brain’s left side where much of our verbal abilities are housed, are also needed, Mr. Kreiter says.

Dr. Mayer’s laboratory is continuing to study subarachnoid bleeding brain and improving questionnaires, rating scales, and operational definitions in the neuropsychological tests patients take. The revised tests should more easily identify levels of impairment, enabling research and treatment to focus on the deficit areas.

The other study, led by Dr. Connolly, looked at levels of one inflammation marker, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1, in serum after hemorrhage. Based on assessments of 101 patients, the researchers concluded that ICAM-1 was elevated in subarachnoid bleeding brain and that these higher levels of the marker in the bloodstream were associated with poor quality of life for patients. The investigators checked ICAM-1 levels every other day for 12 days after the initial hemorrhage. The study appeared in the January issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

One reason the researchers chose ICAM-1 is that animal models of subarachnoid bleeding brain have shown that blocking ICAM-1 improved outcome. However, blocking ICAM-1 in human trials has not worked. A study done elsewhere that used an ICAM-1 antibody to treat stroke patients had to be halted because treated patients had adverse reactions to the antibody.
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain.

what-causes-bleeding-in-brain ?

Can brain hemorrhages be prevented?

Can bleeding brain be prevented?
Symptoms of bleeding brain..
Because the majority of bleeding brain are associated with specific risk factors, you can minimize your risk in the following ways:

* Treat hypertension. Studies show that 80% of cerebral hemorrhage patients have a history of high blood pressure. The single most important thing you can do is control yours through diet, exercise, and medication.
* Don’t smoke.
* Don’t use drugs. Cocaine can increase the risk of bleeding in the brain.
* Drive carefully, and wear your seat belt.
* If you ride a motorcycle, always wear a helmet.
* Investigate corrective surgery. If you suffer from abnormalities, such as aneurysms, surgery may help to prevent future bleeding.
* Be careful with Coumadin. If you take warfarin, follow up regularly with your doctor to make sure your blood levels are in the correct range.
Symptoms of Bleeding Brain..
symptoms-of-bleeding-brain
 

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